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Taxation

GTCo Bank Branches Seal Off In Anambra State For Non-Remittance Of Tax

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Anambra State Government has Sealed Off GTbank branches in the state for non-remittance of tax

…Anambra State Government has Sealed Off GTbank branches in the state for non-remittance of tax

Olushola Okunlade Writes

The leadership of the Anambra Internally Generated Revenue Services led a team of enforcers to seal branches of the bank in the state.

Anambra State Government today sealed off the premises of the Guaranty Trust Co. (GTCo) in the State for non-remittance of tax.

The closure which caught the bank staff and customers unawares saw the customers agonizing over the failure of the banks to remit the tax to the government’s coffer.

Apart from the doors to the banking halls, the gates of the bank branches were firmly locked by the revenue officials.

One of the officials of the banks said the affected bank had issues with the state government over their refusal to remit tax.

An official of AIGRS who craved anonymity said the bank was asked to submit documents relating to deductions of tax.

According to the source, the state government had secured court orders to shut the bank adding that the action was within the ambit of the law.

He said: “The GTCo supposed to pay the tax to the state government but they refused to do so.

BusinessEcho Magazine will bring you details shortly…

Taxation

FIRS To Commence Nationwide Monitoring On Tax Compliance

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…Visits to include MDAs, NGOs, and other corporate bodies

Olushola Okunlade Writes

The Federal Inland Revenue Service (FIRS) has stated that it would embark on a nationwide Value Added Tax (VAT) and Withholding Tax (WHT) compliance exercise from July 2022.

This information is contained in a public notice announcing the compliance monitoring exercise and signed by the FIRS Executive Chairman, Muhammad Nami.

The exercise is coming on the heels of an earlier notice by the Service to commence the enforcement and recovery of unremitted tax deductions owed to the Federation by some States and Local Governments.

The VAT and Withholding Tax Compliance Monitoring exercise will involve teams of FIRS officers visiting selected taxpayers and taxable persons to review their VAT and Withholding Tax records.

“The Federal Inland Revenue Service (FIRS) shall embark on a nationwide VAT and WHT compliance monitoring exercise with effect from July 1, 2022,” the notice reads.

“As a result, teams of officers from the Service shall visit selected taxpayers, taxable persons (including companies, NGOs or MDAs) to review their VAT and WHT records.”

In the notice, Mr. Muhammad Nami also highlighted that the exercise will cover the 2016 to 2020 accounting years for taxable persons whose records have been audited by the Service up to the 2015 accounting year.

He however noted that for taxpayers whose records have not been audited by the Service up to 2015, the exercise will be extended to include the prior years that have not been tax audited.

The Service also called on all taxable persons and tax agents to immediately remit deductions of VAT and Withholding Tax they have made on its behalf.

“All taxable persons or tax agents who have made deductions of VAT or WHT on behalf of the Service are required to immediately remit all such deductions to the FIRS within two weeks of this publication.”

The notice also stated that those who would be visited during the monitoring exercise will be notified and informed of the required documents for review beforehand.

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Taxation

FIRS To Commence Recovery Of Unremitted Tax Deductions By States, Local Governments

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FIRS Calls For Increased Collaboration Within African Countries To Effectively Tax Digital Businesses

Olushola Okunlade Writes

The Federal Inland Revenue Service (FIRS) has stated that it will commence the process of enforcement and recovery of unremitted tax deductions owed by some States and Local Governments in Nigeria.

This decision is contained in a Public Notice, signed by its Executive Chairman, Muhammad Nami, where the tax authority noted that most States and Local Governments have failed to remit the Service Withholding Tax (WHT) and Value Added Tax (VAT) deductions from payments made to contractors and service providers by them as required by law.

The Notice, highlighting relevant portions of the Companies Income Tax Act (CITA) and the Value Added Tax Act (VATA), stated that Ministries, Departments, and Agencies of Government, as well as Parastatals and other establishments, were mandated by law to deduct certain taxes while making payments to third parties and remit those deductions to the FIRS.

“The provisions of Sections 78(3), 79(3), 81 of the Companies Income Tax Act (CITA), and Sections 9(I), 13(1) of the Value Added Tax Act (VATA), mandate Ministries, Departments and Agencies of Government (MDAs), Parastatals and other establishments to deduct WHT and VAT while making payments to third parties and remit same to the Service.

“By the provisions of the relevant laws, States and Local Governments are statutorily mandated, as agents of collection, to deduct at source and remit to the Service, all taxes deducted, within twenty-one days,” the Notice read.

It further stated that most States and Local Governments have failed to comply with these provisions of the law, despite appeals from the FIRS.

“However, it is regrettable to note that most of the States and Local Governments have failed in their responsibilities of remitting WHT and VAT deducted from payments made to contractors and service providers as required by law.

“The implication is the huge tax debts owed by the States and Local Governments.

“All entreaties by the Service to ensure the remittance of the established unremitted tax deductions by the defaulting States and Local Governments have been unsuccessful as a result of lack of cooperation in adopting the e-payment platforms provided by the FIRS for a seamless deduction and remittance of these taxes.”

Following the failure to remit by defaulting States and Local Governments, the FIRS has stated that it will consequently advise the Federal Government and the Honourable Minister of Finance, to henceforth decline approval of any request for the issuance of state bonds or other securities in the capital market; as well as requests for external borrowing and approval for domestic loans from commercial banks or other financial institutions by any of the State and Local Governments with outstanding unremitted tax deductions.

The tax authority stated that it would also publicly name and shame the defaulting States and Local Governments while publishing the amounts owed in unremitted tax deductions.

It further stated that it would also invoke the provisions of Section 24 of its Establishment Act which empowers the Accountant General of the Federation to deduct at source, from the monthly FAAC allocations, un-remitted taxes due from any government agency and to thereafter transfer such deductions to the Federation Account and notify the Service.

The FIRS called on all defaulting States and Local Governments to promptly remit all unremitted tax deductions within 30 days of the publication of the Notice to avoid it taking these enforcement actions.

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Taxation

Nigeria Did Not Endorse The OECD Minimum Corporate Tax Agreement In The Country’s Best Interest – FIRS

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2021 Performance: “We Achieved Over 100 Percent Of Our Target” – FIRS

Nigeria Did Not Endorse The OECD Minimum Corporate Tax Agreement In The Country’s Best Interest – FIRS

Olushola Okunlade Writes

Nigeria’s cautious approach to the endorsement of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)/ G20 Inclusive Framework’s two-pillar solution to the taxation of the digital economy is in the best interest of the country, and to ensure that Nigeria does not lose out on potential revenue from the digital economy.

This was explained in a statement issued to the press by the Executive Chairman of the Federal Inland Revenue Service (FIRS), Muhammad Nami, on Monday.

Explaining in his statement, why the agreement is unfair to Nigeria and the developing countries in general, Muhammad Nami stated that the country, having reviewed the conditions of the agreement had concerns over the impact that the signing of the agreement would have on the country’s tax system and tax revenue generation.

“There are serious concerns on how the rules would compound the issues in our tax system. For instance, to be able to tax any digital sale or any multinational enterprise (MNEs), that company or enterprise must have an annual global turnover of €20 billion and global profitability of 10%. That is a concern. This is because most MNEs that operate in our country do not meet such criteria and we would not be able to tax them.

“Secondly, the €20 billion global annual turnovers in question is not just for one accounting year, but it is that the enterprise must make €20 billion revenue and 10% profitability on average for four consecutive years, otherwise that enterprise will never pay tax in our country, but in the country where the enterprise comes from, or its country of residence,” the statement read.

Thirdly he noted that for Nigeria to subject a Multinational Enterprise to tax under the rule, the entity must have generated at least €1 million in turnovers from Nigeria within a year.

Mr. Muhammad Nami stated that this is an unfair position, especially for domestic companies which, with a minimum of above N25 million (that is about €57,000) turnover, are subject to companies’ income tax in Nigeria. He added that this rule will take off so many Multinational Enterprises from the scope of those that are currently paying taxes to Nigeria. In other words, even the MNEs that are currently paying taxes in Nigeria would cease to pay taxes to us because of this rule.

Fourthly, on the issue of dispute resolutions under the Two-Pillar Solution, the FIRS Executive Chairman explained that the rules were such that in the event of a dispute between Nigeria and a Multinational Enterprise, Nigeria would be subject to an international arbitration panel against Nigeria’s own justice system.

“It would be subject to international arbitration and not Nigeria’s judicial system and laws—even where the income is directly related to a Nigerian member of an MNE group, which is ordinarily subject to tax in Nigeria on its worldwide income and subject to the laws of Nigeria. We are concerned about getting a fair deal from such a process. More so, such a dispute resolution process with a Multinational Enterprise, in an international arbitration panel outside the country, would lead to heavy expenses on legal services, traveling, and other incidental costs.

“Nigeria would spend more; even beyond the tax yield from such cases,” the statement read.

On the issue of Nigeria losing significant revenue if it fails to sign in to the OECD Inclusive Framework rules for the taxation of the digital economy, the FIRS Executive Chairman noted that this was not a problem as the country had already put forward four ongoing solutions to the challenge of taxation of the digital economy.

“One, we have made it a point of practice to annually amend our tax laws to reflect the current global realities, it was courtesy of these reviews that we developed the Significant Economic Presence (SEP) rule, through the Finance Act of 2019 and 2020. The SEP rules set a threshold for Multinational Enterprises, without a physical presence in Nigeria, for registration and payment of taxes to the country.

“Two, we have deployed technology in order for us to bring digital transactions to the tax net. Coupled with the Significant Economic Presence rule, we have started seeing the impact of the technology we have deployed; companies like Twitter, Facebook, Netflix, and LinkedIn, among others who have no physical presence in Nigeria and that were hitherto not paying taxes, have now registered for tax purposes and are paying taxes accordingly. A positive to this is that we surpassed our target in the year 2021, despite the challenge posed to the global economy, including our own economy, by the Covid-19 pandemic.

“The third initiative is the Data-4-Tax Initiative, a blockchain technology which FIRS is jointly developing with the Internal Revenue Service of the 36 states and that of the FCT, under the auspices of the Joint Tax Board. With this project, we are confident that we are going to have a seamless view and access to all economic activities of individuals and corporate bodies in Nigeria going forward, including money spent on digital commerce.

“The fourth is that we have set up a specialized office, the Non-Resident Persons Tax Office, to manage the taxation of non-resident persons and cross-border transactions, including all tax treaty operational issues and the income derived from Nigeria by non-resident individuals and companies,” the statement read.

The Executive Chairman, FIRS appreciated members of the Nigerian public who had raised concerns on various occasions over Nigeria’s decision not to endorse the Two-Pillar solution, stating that their concerns came from a place of genuine passion and patriotism, anchored on seeking a better Nigeria.

“The concerns over Nigeria’s decision not to endorse the agreement are well-understood by us. We know that these questions come from a place of genuine concern and passion for a better Nigeria. We appreciate your patriotism,” Mr. Nami said.

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